Get your Groove back by making a Windows CD toaster!

 

  1. Press the Start button and type Media Player then click to open it.
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  2. In the Organize menu, select Options…
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  3. Select the Rip Music tab.
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  4. In your Microsoft OneDrive account, create a Music subfolder and set that as the location to save ripped music.
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  5. In the Rip settings section set the recording format and audio quality to your liking, but make sure the Rip CD automatically and Eject CD after ripping boxes are checked (this is what makes it act like a toaster!)
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  6. Install and run the Groove Music app on your Windows 10, Android, or iOS device (install from the Store if needed: https://www.microsoft.com/store/apps/9wzdncrfj3pt) and sign in using the same Microsoft Account you use for OneDrive.
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  8. Now just insert a CD in the drive and watch the magic!

 

Notes:

  1. You can set this up on any PC with OneDrive and Windows Media Player so you can rip music at home, at work, or on the go.
  2. You can also copy music files you’ve already ripped into the OneDrive – even upload them to your Music folder via OneDrive in your favorite web browser on any device.
  3. Keep in mind, once the song is ripped, it must be uploaded which depends on your Internet connection – but as long as you’re not in a hurry, the experience will be magical. I set it up for my Mom and she was able to master the process – now she has all of her favorite music wherever she goes.
  4. Anyone in select regions can do this for FREE, no subscription required. Here’s a list of the places this will work today:

Argentina, Australia, Austria, Belgium, Brazil, Canada, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Ireland, Italy, Mexico, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Portugal, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, United Kingdom, United States.

More info:

https://www.microsoft.com/groove/Onedrive

Deal to get $200 Windows upgrade for $40 Expiring on Thursday

When Windows 8 launched, Microsoft wanted to encourage people to upgrade early so they offered a great incentive to existing Windows XP, Windows Vista, and Windows 7 users. As a result, an upgrade that would normally cost $200, costs $40 (or if you bought a Windows 7 PC on or after June 2, 2012, you can get it for $15 here).

They can go to this website and download the Windows 8 Upgrade Assistant which examines your PC for compatibility, gives you a list of hardware and applications that may have compatibility issues (for most machines I’ve seen the fixes have involved re-installing the software after the upgrade) and it gives you a list that you can save.

The upgrade preserves your files, but you may need to re-install desktop applications like Office, Photoshop, etc.

The 2GB installer download took about 4 hours on a relative’s low-end RoadRunner Lite connection (1 Mbit/s), so factor available broadband speeds into your upgrade plans.

If you have a Microsoft Account (an old Hotmail or Xbox Live account for example) that will make the process go faster.

Here’s what I recommend:

  1. In case anything goes really wrong, always backup your files before an operating system upgrade.
  2. To be extra sure, I recommend downloading the SkyDrive desktop app here and transferring any files you’d like to back-up on the cloud. SkyDrive offers 7GB of storage. Other offerings from competitors offer 5GB if you prefer using them.
  3. Install the Windows 8 Pro upgrade via the official Upgrade to Windows 8 website.
  4. Protect your user files with the new File History feature of Windows 8.
  5. Add Windows Media Center to Windows 8 Pro – this is a limited time offer that also expires on Thursday.
  6. After the Windows Store app tile has time to update (it should show 15 or so updates for built-in apps) click on it and in the upper-right-hand corner click the update link, then at the bottom of the page click to install all of them.
  7. Finally, Microsoft is migrating Windows Live Messenger users to Skype and shutting down the old Windows Live Messenger service on March 15th, 2013. I recommend downloading the Skype app from the Windows Store, and also the Skype desktop app. When you sign-in on the desktop app you’ll be given the chance to link your Microsoft accounts, and even connect so you can IM all of your friends on Facebook. This explains what happens when you merge your Skype and Microsoft accounts. I recommend it because for most people it helps simplify by getting all of their IM contacts in one well-organized place.

Remember, you can always get back to the old Windows 7 look and feel by holding-down the start button on your keyboard (the Windows flag logo) and pressing the letter “d” key at the same time.

I hope this helped. With this you should be able to save about $160 per PC – but only if you act before 1/31/2013.

Update: c|net posted a list of links to related articles. I’m including them here in case anyone would like to do some further reading:

Get your cheap Windows 8 upgrade now

Win 8 Pro upgrade jumps from $40 to $200 come February 1

Cheap Windows 8 upgrade may require your Windows 7 key

How to upgrade to Windows 8

Upgrading to Windows 8: What you need to know (FAQ)

Check your PC for Windows 8 readiness with upgrade assistant