Microsoft Teams vs Cisco WebEx for Meetings

Creating a new teams meeting is as easy as clicking New Teams Meeting in the Office ribbon. It’s built-in to Office.

image

Just one click, add a Title, add attendees, and click Send.

With WebEx, you must first create a New Meeting, then add WebEx to the meeting or click Schedule Meeting in the ribbon via with a 3rd party plug-in.  Since it doesn’t fill in the meeting location field, a pop-up needs to be dismissed to send – another extra click.

Converting an existing meeting to a Microsoft Teams meeting is easy as well. Just open the meeting delete the WebEx content in the body (below the line – Do not delete or change any of the following text. –), click Teams Meeting in the ribbon, and click Send Update.

image

Doing so not only results in the Teams meeting experience, but joining the meeting is now easier too.

To join a WebEx meeting, one must first open the meeting, then click the link.  Sometimes one needs to enter their personal info before clicking Join Meeting, and if the meeting is hosted in a personal room, the meeting can’t start without the host (which is a pain if the person is on vacation).  Notifying the host requires a captcha to be entered. It’s just one hassle after another. After all of this, you’re finally able to select the means of connecting to the call. Even if the meeting starts while you’re waiting, you won’t join the meeting until this step is completed.

Contrast this to Teams. If the meeting is selected in your Outlook calendar, a Join Teams Meeting button appears in the ribbon.

 image

Clicking this takes you straight to the audio/video preview to allow you to adjust your settings before joining the meeting and simply pressing <Enter> or clicking Join now adds you to the meeting.

Meeting attendees also have the option of right-clicking the meeting and clicking the Join Teams Meeting option.

image

So there you have it. Teams meetings are easier to set-up, and easier to join than meetings in WebEx, and all of that saved time adds up – so start converting your old WebEx meetings today! Smile

Installing Telerik Test Studio on a Server

It makes life easier to have Telerik Test Studio set up such that it is able to run remote tests after a server restart.  Since this isn’t well documented on the Telerik site, I’m sharing my notes here.  Please let me know if you have anything helpful to add.

Installation Instructions

  1. Log in to server with a dedicated testing account.
  2. Run Telerik Test Studio installer – login with testing account.
  3. After installing, under Control Panel > All Control Panel Items > Programs and Features select Telerik Test Studio and click Change.
  4. On the Welcome tab, select the Next button, then click the Change button.
  5. Under Select features, ensure that Storage Service and Scheduling Server are set to Entire feature will be installed on local hard drive.
  6. On the Ready to change screen, click the Change button.
  7. A screen discussing Database Setup may display. This can be closed (I used defaults).
  8. Since this is running on a server, deal with any alerts that object to the browser being used to navigate to the websites being tested. It’s probably a good idea to whitelist internal addresses such as intranet addresses, dev addresses, staging addresses, extranet addresses, and external addresses.
    Note: Be sure to include the HTTPS version of any secure site URLs or the tests for those environments will time out.
  9. Ensure that the testing user account is set to auto-login on machine reboot.
  10. After starting Test Studio on the server; in the system tray, right click Test Studio Test Runner and then click Show.
  11. At the bottom of the Execution tab, ensure Run on start up is checked.